#03700
Colcannon (The Skillet Pot) (Bob Hallett) video
#2532: YouTube video by chainedbear
℗2009 ~ Used with permission ~

Did you ever eat colcannon,
made from lovely pickled cream,
With the greens and scallions mingled
like a picture in a dream?
Did you ever make a hole on top
to hold the melting flake,
Of the creamy flavoured butter
that your mother used to make?

Oh you did, so you did,
so did he, and so did I,
And the more I think about it,
sure the nearer I'm to die;
Oh, wasn't it the happy days
when troubles we had not,
And our mothers made Colcannon
in the little skillet pot?

Did you ever take potato cake
in a basket to the school,
Tucked underneath your arm with
your book, your slate and rule;
And when the teacher wasn't looking,
sure a great big bite you'd take,
Of the creamy flavoured buttered
soft and sweet potato cake?

Oh you did, so you did,
so did he, and so did I,
And the more I think about it,
sure the nearer I'm to die;
Oh, wasn't it the happy days
when troubles we had not,
And our mothers made Colcannon
in the little skillet pot?

Did you ever go a-courting
as the evening sun went down,
And the moon began a-peeping
from behind the Hill o'Down;
As you wandered down the boreen
where the leprechaun was seen,
And you whispered loving phrases
to your little fair colleen?

Oh you did, so you did,
so did he, and so did I,
And the more I think about it,
sure the nearer I'm to die;
Oh, wasn't it the happy days
when troubles we had not,
And our mothers made Colcannon
in the little skillet pot?

####.... Irish Traditional folk song performed by Bob Hallett of Great Big Sea at the Great Big Sea Fan Show, Ships & Dip V on February 2, 2009, aboard the cruise ship Norwegian Jewel. ....####
See more songs by Great Big Sea.

From Wikipedia: Colcannon (Irish: cál ceannann, meaning "white-headed cabbage") is a traditional Irish dish of mashed potatoes with kale or cabbage - as well as the name of a song about the dish. Colcannon is traditionally made from mashed potatoes and kale (or cabbage), with milk (or cream), butter, salt and pepper added. It can contain other ingredients such as scallions (spring onions), leeks, onions and chives. There are many regional variations of this dish. It is often eaten with boiled ham or Irish bacon. At one time it was a cheap, year-round staple food, though nowadays it is usually eaten in autumn/winter, when kale comes into season.



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